Frequently Asked Questions:

Q: I’d like to host an event at Freedom Park. What do I do?

A: Freedom Park is a passive park, which means there are limitations to events that can be held in the park. The general guideline is that if your event would last for an hour or more, and/or have more than 75 attendees, it can not take place in Freedom Park.

To get more information or to inquire about events in Freedom Park, contact the City of Atlanta’s Parks Department’s permitting specialist by emailing awright@atlantaga.gov.

Q: I’d like to display a piece of art in the park. What do I do?

A: The City of Atlanta’s Parks Department has an application process for a Temporary Art Project permit. Artworks must be approved through this process.

If you are interested in displaying a temporary art installation in Freedom Park, please contact the City of Atlanta Parks DepartmentFreedom Park Conservancy, and complete this application for Temporary Art Projects in Freedom Park.

Q: Who owns Freedom Park?

The land that makes up Freedom Park is owned by the Georgia DOT and was leased to the City of Atlanta in 1992 for 99 years. The land may only be used as a public park, according to this legal document. Freedom Park Conservancy is a nonprofit “friends of” group that advocates for the park.

Q: What is that weird tunnel I drive through on Freedom Parkway?

A: An ice canopy! It shields cars and pedestrians in the case of ice falling from the WSB-TV Tower. Read more here!

Q: I’ve heard that there are plans for a pedestrian bridge at Moreland Avenue and Freedom Parkway. What is FPC’s position?

A: There has been public dialogue about a bridge over Moreland Avenue. The mission of Freedom Park Conservancy is to promote the improvement of the park for a diverse public. The Conservancy encourages the exploration of all ideas that would improve the connectivity, safety, and beauty of the park.

We would like to see the concept studied with full public participation and the complete involvement of all stakeholders, particularly the neighborhoods bordering the park. We intend to be part of the conversation, and anticipate the bridge will also be explored as part of our upcoming master planning process.

Freedom Park